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Third-party interactions

Allow a third party to interact with your customers on your payment terminals.

Apart from accepting payments, you can use your payment terminals to interact with your customers in other ways. For example, to get feedback on your service, engage customers in your loyalty program, or ask their details for sending a digital receipt. Typically, the data is collected through input requests, and forwarded to a back-end system that produces the intended result.

You can set this up yourself. But you can also engage the services of companies specialized in surveys, customer loyalty, digital receipts, and so on. That is because we support third-party interactions, where another company can interact with your terminals directly without having to integrate with your POS system.

Depending on what you want to achieve, third parties can:

  • Send non-payment requests to your terminals, like input requests for gathering answers from your customers, and display requests to show information like a 'Thank you' message.
  • Receive Terminal API display notifications.
    These notifications are generated by the terminal, are sent as webhooks, and contain updates on the progress of a payment on the terminal.
  • Receive standard webhooks.
    These webhooks are generated on the Adyen payments platform and contain transaction details.

Third-party interaction with the terminal doesn't interrupt the payment process.

Third-party interactions currently do not work with the OPI integration.

Security and requirements

Third parties can't send payment or card acquisition requests to your terminals. If they try to send such a request, the request is refused with an HTTP status code of 010 Not Allowed.

Third-party interaction is possible:

  • In a Terminal API integration with WebSockets enabled.
    You can check the WebSockets setting in your Customer Area, under In-person payments > Terminal settings > Integrations.
  • With specific terminal models: M400, P400 Plus, V210, V400m.

How it works

To enable third-party interactions you need to complete the setup as follows:

  1. Together with the third-party, you decide when the interaction should happen:

    • Before payment from v.1.86: when you send a payment request, the terminal sends a READY_3RD_PARTY notification to the third party and pauses briefly. The third party sends their input and display requests to your terminal. Then the payment continues.

    • After payment from v.1.82: when you send a payment request, the third party waits until they receive a TENDER_FINAL notification. This indicates the payment is completed. Then the third party sends their input and display requests to your terminal.

    The default is after payment. You must inform our Support Team so they can enable your choice: interaction before payment, after payment, or both.

  2. You set up display notifications for the third party. For every step of the tender process, the third party receives a display notification that contains:

    • The POIID of the terminal. This tells the third party where to send a request.
    • The progress of the payment. This tells the third party when to send a request.
    • The TransactionID: the tender reference. When the payment is completed, the terminal sends a TENDER_FINAL display notification. In this notification, the PSP reference is added in the format `[tender reference].[PSP reference] is appended with the PSP reference: for cross-reference with a standard webhooks.
  3. You set up standard webhooks for the third party. For every payment, the third party will receive a webhook that includes the outcome of the payment, the amount, the PSP reference, and more. Based on the PSP reference, the third party can link the customer's transaction to their rating, for richer reporting.

  4. You set up an API credential for the third party. This enables the third party to authenticate the input and display requests that they send.

The next sections describe the message flows for third-party interaction before payment or after payment.

Interaction before payment

The message flow with third-party interaction before payment is as follows:

  1. The POS app sends a payment request to the payment terminal.

  2. The terminal sends a READY_3RD_PARTY display notification to the third party, and pauses.

  3. The third party sends an input request to the terminal.

  4. The customer provides their input on the terminal, and the third party receives the response.

  5. To thank the customer, the third party sends a display request with an image. The image disappears after the time-out set in the request, or after a default time-out of three seconds. (This step is not shown in the diagram below.)

  6. The payment takes place on the terminal.

  7. When the payment is completed, the third party receives a standard webhook for the payment from the Adyen payments platform.

The following diagram illustrates the message flow for third-party interaction before payment. In the diagram, the POS uses cloud communications, but with local communications the third-party interaction with the terminal is the same.

Interaction after payment

The message flow with third-party interaction after payment is as follows:

  1. The POS app sends a payment request to the payment terminal.

  2. The terminal sends display notifications to the third party for every step of the tender process, from TENDER_CREATED when the payment starts, to TENDER_FINAL when the payment is completed.

  3. When the payment process is finished, the third party sends an input request to the terminal.

  4. The customer provides their input on the terminal, and the third party receives the response.

  5. To thank the customer, the third party sends a display request with an image. The image disappears after the time-out set in the request, or after a default time-out of three seconds. (This step is not shown in the diagram below.)

  6. The third party receives a standard webhook for the payment from the Adyen payments platform.

The following diagram illustrates the message flow for third-party interaction after payment. In the diagram, the POS uses cloud communications, but with local communications the third-party interaction with the terminal is the same.

Set up third-party webhook endpoints

To receive webhooks from Adyen terminals and the Adyen payments platform, the third party needs to configure their system. Then you need to set up third-party webhooks in your Customer Area.

Configuration by the third-party

  1. Inform the third party of the requirements for receiving webhooks:

    • Their system needs to have:

      • One or more endpoints that can receive webhooks in JSON format. They may get two kinds of webhooks: display notifications from the terminals, and standard webhooks from the Adyen payments platform.
      • For the test environment: an open TCP port for HTTP traffic (80, 8080, or 8888) or HTTPS traffic (443, 8443, or 8843) with TLSv1.2.
      • For the live environment: an open TCP port for HTTPS traffic (443, 8443, or 8843) with TLSv1.2.
      • Optional: a username and password for basic authentication.
    • If they want to receive standard webhooks, they should verify the HMAC signature of the standard webhook and they must acknowledge every standard webhook with a successful HTTP response status code, for example 200. For instructions, refer the third party to our development resources for webhooks.

  2. Ask the third party for the endpoints and basic authentication credentials they set up for receiving webhooks.
    You need to provide those details in your Customer Area in the next steps.

Set up display notifications

To set up display notifications for the third party:

  1. Make sure you know the endpoint where the third party wants to receive display notifications, and the basic authentication credentials.

  2. Log in to your Customer Area and switch to the account, store, or terminal that you want to set up notifications for.

  3. Go to In-person payments > Terminal settings > Integrations.

  4. In the Terminal API section, select Decrypted.

  5. Under Display URLs, select the pencil icon and then select Add new.

  6. Select the pencil icon next to the field that appears.
    The Add URL dialog opens.

  7. Enter the details:

    • URL: the URL of the endpoint where the third party wants to receive display notifications.
    • Username and Password (optional): the basic authentication credentials that the third party set up on their server.
    • Public: select this option. Indicates that the specified URL is on a public network.
    • Local: don't select this option; not applicable for third-party interactions.

  8. Select Add URL and then Save.

  9. If your integration uses local communications, ask our Support Team to ensure display notifications are not encrypted.
    This step is necessary because with local communications the terminal generates encrypted notifications and the third party can't decrypt those.

Set up standard webhooks

Currently there are no restrictions enforced on the details that third parties can receive in standard webhooks. We advise you to limit the details to the minimum required for your use case, by enabling as few additional settings as possible.

To set up third-party standard webhooks:

In your Customer Area, enable and configure webhooks for your company account, merchant account, and merchant account groups.

1. Make sure you know the endpoint where the third party wants to receive standard webhooks, and the basic authentication username and password of their webhook server. 2. If the payment terminals that the third party will interact with are boarded to one specific merchant account, switch to that merchant account.
  1. In your Customer Area, go to Developers >  Webhooks.

  2. Select Create new webhook.

  3. From the list of webhooks, select Add for the one to add.

  4. Under General, configure the following:

    Setting Description
    Enabled Select the toggle to enable or disable the webhook.
    Version The webhook version.
    Description Your description of the webhook.
  5. Under Server configuration, configure the following:

    Setting Description
    URL The URL of the third-party webhook server. It must be a public URL.
    Method JSON, HTTP POST, or SOAP
    Encryption protocol TLSv1.2 or TLSv1.3
  6. Under Security, configure the following:

    Setting Description
    Basic authentication Enter the username and password of the third-party server.
    HMAC Key Generate a new HMAC Key or use an existing HMAC key.
  7. Under Events settings, select the event codes for this webhook. Some webhook types don't support more than one event code, so this setting does not appear.

  8. If the Additional settings section is available, optionally select the additional information you want to receive in this webhook. Some webhook types don't support more than one event code, so this section does not appear.

  9. Select Save configuration.

READY_3RD_PARTY display notification

Set up the third-party API credential

If the third party wants to send Terminal API requests to your terminals, they must authenticate their requests with an API key. This means you need to create a special third-party API credential for your account and share it with the third party.

The third-party API credential has limited access and can't be used to make payments. Like all API credentials, it consists of:

  • An API key.
  • API permissions: roles required for the type of request, and accounts that the API key is valid for.

To be able to create the third-party API credential, you must have one of the following user roles:

  • Merchant admin
  • Manage API credentials

To create the third-party API credential:

  1. Log in to your Customer Area, and go to Developers > API credentials.
    This opens a list with all API credentials linked to your company account.
  2. Select Add standardized user.
  3. Select thirdParty_xxxxxx@Company.[YourCompanyAccount].
    In this third-party API credential username, xxxxxx will be replaced with numbers.
  4. Select Add.
  5. In the list of API credentials, select the new third-party API credential username.
  6. To generate an API key, under Server settings > Authentication select the API key tab. Select Generate API key, copy the API key using the copy icon and store the third-party API key securely in your system.
  7. Select Save changes.
  8. Under Permissions > Roles select the role Thirdparty interaction with in-store terminals, and make sure no other roles are selected.
  9. Under Permissions > Accounts select the accounts that the third-party credential needs to have access to.
    Make sure these are the accounts that you set up webhooks for.
  10. Select Save changes.
  11. Securely send the API key to the third party.

Let the third party send requests

If the third party wants to send Terminal API requests to your terminals, inform them that they need to:

  1. Listen to the Terminal API display notifications sent to their webhooks server. These include:

    • A MessageHeader with a POIID field that identifies the terminal.
    • A ReferenceID field with an event that indicates when the terminal is ready to receive a request.

  2. In the MessageHeader of their input or display request, include a POIID field with the same value received in the display notification.

  3. Format the rest of the request as described in our documentation.

    • For an example input request, see Ask for a rating. That shows a screen that on various display sizes could look as follows:

    • For both input and display request, the third party should set a time-out using MinimumDisplayTime. Otherwise the request will time out after three seconds.

  4. Authenticate their request by specifying their third-party API key in the x-API-key header of the HTTP request.

Canceling an in-progress interaction

To block an incoming third-party interaction request, you can cancel the request:

Cancel from your POS app

In general, requests are cancelled by sending an AbortRequest containing the ServiceID of the request you want to cancel. However, because the third party is sending the request, your POS app doesn't know the ServiceID. The solution is to send a DisplayRequest that instructs the terminal to show the standby screen.

To cancel an in-progress third-party request from the POS app:

  1. Make a POST request to a Terminal API endpoint, specifying:

    • MessageHeader: the standard SaleToPOIRequest.MessageHeader object. Specify:

      Parameter Required Description
      ProtocolVersion -white_check_mark- 3.0
      MessageClass -white_check_mark- Device
      MessageCategory -white_check_mark- Display
      MessageType -white_check_mark- Request
      ServiceID -white_check_mark- Your unique ID for this request, consisting of 1-10 alphanumeric characters. Must be unique within the last 48 hours for the terminal (POIID) being used.
      SaleID -white_check_mark- Your unique ID for the POS system component to send this request from.
      POIID -white_check_mark- The unique ID of the terminal to send this request to. Format: [device model]-[serial number].
    • DisplayRequest.DisplayOutput: An array containing a single array item with:

      Parameter Value
      Device CustomerDisplay
      InfoQualify Display
      OutputContent.OutputFormat MessageRef
      OutputContent.PredefinedContent.ReferenceID Idle
  2. Check the response. If the request is successful, the response contains:

    • OutputResult.Response.Result: Success

    The terminal switches to the standby screen.

  3. The third party receives a response containing:

    • ErrorCondition: Cancel
    • Result: Failure
    • AdditionalResponse: the message A higher priority request has been received.

    The next example shows the response to an input request after canceling from the POS app:

Cancel from the terminal

To cancel an in-progress third-party interaction on a terminal:

  • On the terminal keypad, select the Cancel key
    In case of a terminal without a keypad, on the display select the Cancel icon if the screen includes that.

If this is successful:

  • The terminal shows the standby screen.
  • The third party receives a response containing:

    • ErrorCondition: Cancel
    • Result: Failure

    The next example shows the response to an input request after canceling from the terminal:

Testing

After setting up all aspects of the third-party interaction, you need to check that the interaction behaves as expected. Contact the third party to discuss the scenarios to test for your specific use case.

Here is an example of tests to run for a use case where the third party sends an input request:

  1. Make a test transaction that is expected to trigger the third-party interaction.
    • Check that the expected question appears on the terminal.
    • React by giving an answer on the terminal.
  2. Repeat, but this time don't react when the question appears, and check that the interaction times out as expected.
  3. Repeat, but this time decline giving an answer, or cancel the interaction on the terminal.
  4. Repeat, but this time cancel the interaction from the POS app.

  5. Repeat all the above tests with other test transactions that are expected to trigger the third-party interaction. For example, test different payment instruments like credit cards, debit cards, and digital wallets. Or test different entry methods like tapping, inserting, and swiping.

See also